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A: You can download offline maps here. (AP Photo/Richard Drew) One of the most persistent myths about political donations is that if you're rich and you donate to a politician or to a campaign committee, your money is being used to benefit the poor, the needy, or the down-and-out. This is not the case. A new study by the nonpartisan Campaign Finance Institute looked at the effect of campaign donations on the economic well-being of Americans. The results show that rich people are better off politically than poor people, and that high-earning, high-income individuals receive a disproportionate share of donations. Here are four quick takeaways from the study, which you can read in full here. The rich get richer. Donations from individuals earning $1 million or more tend to be 2.5 times more expensive than donations from individuals earning less than $50,000 a year. The rich get richer. Donations from individuals earning $1 million or more tend to be 2.5 times more expensive than donations from individuals earning less than $50,000 a year. The poor do better. Donations from individuals earning less than $50,000 a year are almost as effective at boosting a political candidate's campaign coffers as donations from individuals earning $1 million or more. Donations from individuals earning less than $50,000 a year are almost as effective at boosting a political candidate's campaign coffers as donations from individuals earning $1 million or more. Campaign finance is more generous for rich people than it is for poor people. The average donation from individuals earning less than $50,000 a year is $27, compared to an average donation of $224 from individuals earning more than $1 million. The average donation from individuals earning less than $50,000 a year is $27, compared to an average donation of $224 from individuals earning more than $1 million. The impact of campaign donations is not universal. The study found that donations of $2,500 or more are a greater political force for higher-income people. Donations of $2,500 or more "pertain[ ] most strongly to people with incomes of at least $200,000, although they are also of some importance to lower-income people." Read the full study here. For more from the author, follow him on Twitter or find him at @mrichardsonfox.




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